Our Story

MozParks Foundation was formed by the directors of Sabie Game Park and its associates. The goal was to provide support to the private investors of wildlife conservation areas in their efforts to protect the conservation areas. Investing in conservation areas anywhere in Africa does not come cheap or easy. Responsibilities including anti-poaching and community engagement is a full time job in itself, often taking focus and resources away from properly managing the area as a whole.

Our Team

Directors

Sandy McDonald, RSA

 

Will Perry, USA

 

Alex McDonald, RSA

Larry Harvey, USA

Advisors

Oyvind Christensen, Norway

 

Dr. Carlos Pereira, Mozambique

Col. Lionel Dyck, RSA

Fernando Paulina Chicolowe, Mozambique

Team

Dr. Joao Almeida, Portugal

George Boyce, USA

 

DAG Team, Mozambique

Our Partners

 

 

 

STEWARDS OF WILDLIFE 

 

LOCAL COMMUNITIES

 

LAND OWNERS

DYCK ADVISORY GROUP(DAG)

 

ANAC

 

WWF

 

SAWC

 

THE COUNTRY
 

Mozambique was formally known as “Portuguese East Africa”. It was considered a Portuguese Province abroad which later became an independent country in June 25th1975 where after the country was torn again by civil war in a struggle for power. Finally, in 1992, a peace agreement was signed between the two major warring parties Frelimo and Renamo followed by a democratic election which was won by Frelimo. Today the country is at peace, welcoming major foreign investment and subject to economic growth.


 

THE WILDLIFE
 

As a result of poverty, and the need to fund soldiers and feed locals, natural resources that were readily available during the wars were harvested in great numbers and traded with. This led to a large decline, even complete non existence of many species in the country. Thanks to political will, education in rural regions and conservation efforts from the private sector, the presence of wildlife in the country has grown dramatically.

 

 

THE PEOPLE

 

Generally speaking, the people of Mozambique are humble and friendly. Despite the country’s economic growth and development since the wars, it is estimated that 65% of the inhabitants of Mozambique still live in rural areas. This means that outside of city hubs much of their wealth is dependent on natural recourses, which if not managed properly are at risk of depletion.